How to Turn Fitness from a Chore to a Hobby in Less Than a Year

When you think about a hobby that you enjoy what feelings come to mind? Happiness, Excitement, Contentment? Well, if you make fitness your hobby, you can have these same types of emotions every time you work out! So, how do you make the transition from dreading your exercise time to looking forward to it the same way you do your other hobbies?

The problem with trying to make exercise a habit and it’s something that we’ve all faced, is that you usually try to exercise 3 or 4 times a week … and that makes creating a new exercise habit difficult.

The reason is that the more consistent an action is, the more likely it is to be a habit.

Here are some tips:

 

 

 

Experts agree that a morning schedule is best. "If you go to a gym, it should be located between your home and work". Exercise, take a shower, and you're energized for the day.

The next best thing to exercising first thing in the morning is to do it on your way home from work. There aren't a lot of people who are so motivated that after they go home and change clothes will go back out again and exercise.

Chances are, you'll feel better after exercising. "It energizes us". "You breathe deeply, and your body makes better use of the oxygen exchange. You'll get an exercise-induced euphoria during the activity and for some time after."

Write down the things that are important to you. It could be how much time you exercise each day, how many steps you walked, how far you ran or cycled, what you weighed, etc.

Some people make a game of it. You may have heard of runners calculating the miles it would take to run from their homes to Boston (home of the famous marathon), figuring how far they run in an average week and setting a target date for "arriving" in Boston.

It's great when your clothes fit better, and you can lift heavier weights or work out longer without getting exhausted. But there is a slew of other progress indicators, such as:

 

 

 

Are you telling yourself that you don't deserve a reward for something you should be doing anyway -- or that once you can zip your jeans without lying on the bed, that will be reward enough? Well, honestly, how inspiring is that?

Experts say that making behavior changes is hard, and rewards motivate. So, decide on a goal and a reward, and work toward it. You might buy yourself a video you've wanted after you stick to your fitness plan for one month or buy new walking shoes when you achieve 5,000 steps a day. Do whatever works for you.

 

CONCLUSION

There are many benefits to having a hobby (such as stress relief and greater levels of happiness) and they are magnified when that hobby is fitness. Make fitness your hobby and you will not be disappointed!